Anna S. (eliade) wrote,
Anna S.
eliade

the biggest ball of twine...

More stuff from my LJ topic list.

So, I've had this stray thought a few times over the past couple of years--it doesn't reflect any serious intent, more of a theoretical curiosity. You know how there are all these copyright ideas about fair use and parody and so forth, used to help justify using other people's material. A lot of it goes over my head unless I focus on it and bear down to try and understand. Anyway, could a reasonable legal argument be made for publishing a novel that was framed as a kind of "Arabian Nights" meta-story, in which original characters told, say, Buffy-based stories? Like, within their conversations, or as verbal narrative. ("And then Buffy said...") I know there are a few legal beagles reading this. Anyone?




Some recs. Please note that I lift many of these from the ever busy and bootylicious bonibaru. (I'm just guessing about the bootylicious thing. But hey, any wild-ass assumption for alliteration's sake.)

This weekend I read Jenn's new SV story, Turn You on Somehow, which is just--ssssssss--sizzling hot. It's weird--I had a resistance to M/M/F menage a trois scenarios back when I entered online fandom, and they're still not a kink or anything, but I've mellowed and now I'm like, sure, bring it on--if it works, great.

And I Loved Him That He Did Pity Them is a nice, sweet Sam/Frodo story that isn't so nice and sweet, now that I think about it. Actually, it's Sam Angst! Yay, Sam Angst. You just don't see enough Sam/Frodo. At least I don't. Feel free to fling some my way.

I also came across this surprisingly hot and effective Lindsey/Spike story, Looking at You, that I recced on BBF. I love when people make unconventional pairings work well, and this gives great Lindsey voice, and characterization. I think this is actually in part responsible for my sudden, unexpected capitulation to the inevitability of DVDs. Er, yes, I followed up my order of the first four seasons of Buffy on DVD with an order for the first season of Angel. Moving on now.....

And hey, bonibaru wrote "Jayne/Vera gunporn" that I'd somehow missed up until now. Go read it, because...um, just because. If you need to ask, then perhaps you *shouldn't* be reading Jayne/Vera gunporn. Meanwhile, I'll be in my bunk. *

(* I think I've just maxed out my monthly quota for use of that phrase. Damn.)




In the non-fiction realm, I pass on more cool discussion links, one a thread that asks "What is darkfic?" and another that suggests things to do in fandom when you're bored.

I was trying to think about my own definition of darkfic, and I'm not sure I know what it is. I'm told my own stuff is dark--I mean, it's labeled "noir" for a reason--but really, it doesn't *feel* dark when I'm writing. It feels, um, fun. In terms of genre, I don't necessarily consider sticky, nasty kink-fic dark. I think dark has to be a personal definition, and when I do define it, I find I'm not really so much a dark reader. Now, writers I love do write some dark stories--waves to Kat Allison--but their themes in the hands of lesser writers make me flee. When it comes to dark, I trust the writers I know, but I don't go seeking out untested authors. Here are some things I consider dark that I don't go looking for: apocalyptic fiction; death stories; stories that portray the slow, painful dissolution of a relationship, especially when it hinges on miscommunication or misunderstandings; stories tinged with bitterness and regret, set in the old age of currently young characters; stories set after the death of a major and much loved character, revolving around those left behind; and what I'd call "entropic" stories--sheepishly waves again to Kat--that embody the philosophy "everything falls apart," and center on themes of hopelessness or the painful existential isolation of humanity.

Bummer, huh?

There are themes generally considered dark by other people that I tend to find entertaining, and you'll see me tossing popcorn in my mouth and reading them with casual, even callous enthusiasm, if the flavor of the writing matches my tastes: rape, non-consensual sex, slavery, prostitution, exquisitely good torture, etc. Of course, you probably knew that already. Moving on.

Oh, wait, we're at the end. Never mind. Ciao for now.

Edited to add: This freakin' *great* essay about Spike's soul from hecatehatesthat. I go back and forth on the soul issue--I think it could be a very cool part of Spike's arc, but on the other hand, the idea of redemption without one is fascinating to me. Perhaps more on this later today, or next year, or whenever I think about it again.


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